Alex Little Soldier Wind Turbine / 2003

Blog Entry Alex Little Soldier Wind Turbine by Ann for everyone
 
Alex Little Soldier Wind TurbineThe Alex Little Soldier Wind Turbine was built with NativeEnergy’s financial support in the spring of 2003. The turbine is located near the town of Rosebud, on the Rosebud Sioux reservation in south-central South Dakota. Tribal officials see this first turbine as a start of an economic development initiative that will bring a vital industry to the reservation – a “show horse” with an educational mission. In addition to the support from our customers, the Rosebud single turbine project and plans for the wind farm were funded under a DOE grant and loan from the Rural Utility Service. Disgen, Inc. provided development services.

See construction and dedication photos.

“We appreciate NativeEnergy’s help in getting this first turbine built, and we’re excited about how their WindBuilderssm program engages people in the fight against global warming by helping to build new wind farms.”

–William Kindle, (then) President,
Rosebud Sioux Tribe

The Alex Little Soldier wind turbine is a 750 kilowatt (kW) NEG Micon wind turbine. The turbine stands atop a 170 foot tubular tower and has three blades, spanning a diameter of 150 feet. The gearbox and generator are located at the top of the tower in an enclosure known as a “nacelle.” Cables transmit electricity generated by the wind turbines to a transformer at the base of the tower, and then to the local electric distribution line. The wind turbine begins generating electricity when wind speeds exceed 8 mph. It reaches its maximum 750 kW rating at 31 mph, and will shut down when wind speeds exceed 55 mph. The average wind speed at the site is estimated to be 17.9 mph at a 155 feet above ground, and the turbine is expected to produce about 2,400,000 kilowatt hours (kWh) of clean electricity each year, enough to supply about 200 homes.

“The tremendous wind resources of the northern Great Plains have many Indian tribes looking at utility scale renewable energy generation as a “no-regrets” sustainable homeland economic development strategy, with a positive impact on CO2 emission reductions. And the Rosebud Wind Project is leading the way in bringing tribal utility scale wind power on line.”

— Pat Spears, President, Intertribal COUP.

According to Bob Gough, the attorney who represented the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in connection with the project’s development, “NativeEnergy’s funding was approximately 25% of the cost of the Rosebud turbine. NativeEnergy’s promise of additional revenue for the renewable energy credits, to be paid up front to the project once it achieved commercial operation, was a valuable component of the overall project financing and helped make it possible for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe to make the final decision to move ahead. As the project approached completion, it became clear that the payment from NativeEnergy was critical to both the coverage of costs associated with this first turbine and the work that the Tribe began for the expansion of wind development on the Rosebud Reservation.”

Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm

NativeEnergy has been supporting the development of the Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm on the Rosebud Sioux Tribe Reservation since completion of the Alex Little Soldier Wind Turbine in 2003. The 30 MW project is currently in final negotiations with a local utility that is now interested in purchasing both the energy and the renewable energy credits (RECs) that the project can provide. Due to the utility�s interest in purchasing all the RECs from the 30 MW of capacity and the recent determination that additional interconnection capacity is not available, NativeEnergy is no longer offering RECs or related carbon offset sales from this project � at least until the final details of the utility arrangements are settled. These final details may continue the sale of a portion of the RECs to NativeEnergy. In accordance with our Terms and Conditions of Sale, we will arrange for a replacement source if our withdrawal is required for this project to succeed. Further, due to the slippage of the expected project start date into 2008, we will be replacing previously assigned sales from the Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm that were made prior to April 1, 2007 � after which allowance was made in our Terms and Conditions for a delayed 2008 operations date. For more information, please click here. We are proud that our support has helped kept this project moving forward and we look forward to its completion.

Mandan, Hidatsa & Arikara Nation Demonstration Wind Turbine Project (back to top)

NativeEnergy’s customers have helped build a new 60 kW single turbine of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation on their reservation in North Dakota. In anticipation of support from NativeEnergy, the MHA Turbine was constructed in September, 2005 and was fully commissioned in early October.

This single turbine project is the MHA Nation’s first step in wind development, like the Alex Little Soldier Wind Turbine was for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Its purpose is to facilitate its development of a 10 MW wind farm as phase 2. This 10 MW wind farm will be one of eight 10 MW wind farms comprising the 80 MW Intertribal Council On Utility Policy distributed wind project. The MHA turbine is expected to produce about 144,593 kWh per year.

Toksook Bay Alaska Native Village Wind Turbines

NativeEnergy’s customers have helped fund a two-year operations and maintenance reserve for three Northwind 100 kW turbines built in the village of Toksook Bay, Alaska, which began operations in July, 2006. Owned and operated by the non-profit Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, these three turbines are expected to produce about 643,633 kilowatt-hours per year. Every kilowatt-hour they produce means one fewer kilowatt-hours is generated by the diesel generators that otherwise provide power for this village. To be competitive with the diesel generators, the turbines need to be able to produce power for 15 cents per kWh or less. As the turbines need to operate in extremely harsh conditions, and are only accessible by air, weather permitting, our funding of the operations and maintenance reserve is helping avoid the significant periods of “down time” that the Coop’s prior projects had experienced due to inadequate O&M funding. As “first of their kind” projects in this region, the projects will set precedents for — or against — broader implementation. Our goal was to provide sufficient O&M funding to ensure that these projects demonstrate that wind power is economic in Alaska Native villages, and so worth replicating. Any of our funding that is not needed to cover O&M expenses will be used for additional wind development.

Kasigluk Alaska Native Village Wind Turbines

NativeEnergy’s customers have helped fund a two-year operations and maintenance (O&M) reserve for three Northwind 100 kW turbines built in the village of Kasigluk, Alaska, which began operations in July, 2006. Owned and operated by the non-profit Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, these three turbines are expected to produce about 595,595 kilowatt-hours per year. Every kilowatt-hour they produce means one fewer kilowatt-hours is generated by the diesel generators that otherwise provide power for this village. To be competitive with the diesel generators, the turbines need to be able to produce power for 15 cents per kWh or less. As the turbines need to operate in extremely harsh conditions, and are only accessible by air, weather permitting, our funding of the operations and maintenance reserve is helping avoid the significant periods of “down time” that the Coop’s prior projects had experienced due to inadequate O&M funding. As “first of their kind” projects in this region, the projects will set precedents for — or against — broader implementation. Our goal was to provide sufficient O&M funding to ensure that these projects demonstrate that wind power is economic in Alaska Native villages, and so worth replicating. Any of our funding that is not needed to cover O&M expenses will be used for additional wind development.

http://www.nativeenergy.com/pages/our_projects/14.php

Patrick Spears Patrick Spear, Management Committe Memeber

Mr. Patrick Spears is a member of NativeEnergy’s Management Committee and co-founder and President of the Intertribal Council On Utility Policy (COUP), representing eleven Tribes in the Dakotas, Wyoming, and Nebraska. Intertribal COUP is involved in policy issues and outreach education to Tribal governments, Tribal Colleges, and indigenous environmental organizations on telecommunications, climate change, energy planning, energy efficiency and renewable energy development. The policy work includes specific proposals to support renewable energy development, energy efficiency, and as team member of the Intertribal Energy Network. Mr. Spears has worked in tribal government and Indian programs in various capacities over the past 30 years.

As a member of the development team, he assisted in the first commercial, utility scale wind turbine project (750 kW) at the Rosebud Casino and on feasibility and development of the 30 MW project for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. He has provided consultant services for the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe on feasibility for community and wind-hydro pump storage projects and is currently consulting with the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe on community and rural wind projects. Spears also manages the wind energy feasibility and development for community and commercial wind power for the eight COUP Tribes in the 80 MW Intertribal Wind Project.

Intertribal COUP represents Tribal energy interests from regulatory and economic perspectives at regional and national levels on regulatory issues, policy analysis, energy development plans, and legislative proposals. Mr. Spears views energy as a key component of sustainable development and economic restoration. The energy interests range from utility regulation policy, energy planning, energy efficiency, and renewable energy with emphasis on wind energy development.

Mr. Spears is a member of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe and completed undergraduate work in Sociology with emphases in Anthropology and Indian Studies from the University of South Dakota, and graduate study in Public Administration at the Washington D.C. Public Affairs Center, University of Southern California.

pat.spears@nativeenergy.com

Robert Gough

Robert Gough
Bob Gough is an attorney with graduate degrees in sociology and cultural ecology, with over 30 years experience and two fellowships on tribal cultural and natural resource issues.

The first director and now a consultant to the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Utility Commission, Gough participated in WAPA negotiations for tribal allocations of federal hydroelectric power. He is the secretary of the Intertribal Council On Utility Policy, an organization composed of federally recognized Indian tribes in the Northern Great Plains providing a forum on rights and resources for utility services on tribal lands, and co-chairs the national assessment’s Native Peoples/Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop.

Gough contracts with the DOE -Wind Powering America program’s Wind Powering Native America Initiative, and co-directs the NativeWind.org and EnergyIndependenceDay.org campaigns supporting partnerships between ICLEI-Cities for Climate Protection and the Intertribal COUP tribes interested in building sustainable homeland economies based upon renewable energy.

bob.gough@nativeenergy.com

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